How to sue for a breach of contract in Georgia

| Sep 23, 2020 | Business Law |

If two parties are involved in a contract and one party doesn’t hold up their end of the agreement, the other might be able to sue for a breach of contract. A successful lawsuit could result in the offending party paying out damages or holding up their end of the contract. However, a potential lawsuit must meet certain qualifications for it to be viable in court.

When an individual can sue for a breach of contract

An individual can sue a party that fails to hold up their end of the contract. This might involve services not rendered or performed to the expectations lined out in the contract. However, most contracts have to be in writing to be enforceable. This includes property sales, property leases, debt repayment contracts and contracts that involve a certain amount of money. The laws can vary across different states, so individuals should do some research or consult a business law attorney to see if the contract is enforceable in court.

Additionally, the individual must sue the other party within the statute of limitations. This can also vary across different states. If the contract is enforceable and the statute of limitations hasn’t expired, a client could potentially bring a lawsuit against the other party. Contracts involving relatively small dollar amounts are typically settled in a small claims court.

Getting assistance with contract disputes

An individual who needs help with a business dispute might be interested in consulting with an attorney. Legal counsel can offer advice on a wide range of issues, including contract disputes, tax issues, land use, employee policies, partnerships and more. The attorney may be able to settle the dispute before it reaches the courts. If not, they could help the client sue the other party.

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